更新:2013年7月1日

原文 全訳版

Responsibilities of Authorship*

William M. Vollmer, PhD

(CHEST 2007; 132:2042-2045)

Publishing is a necessary fact of life for researchers, required for both promotion opportunities and continued funding. For collaborative projects, the pressure to publish can lead to tension among legitimate coauthors over the order of authorship and to abuse of the process by researchers wishing to pad their resumes. Prospective authors may also feel pressure to manipulate their data or misrepresent their findings to increase the likelihood that a given manuscript will be published or to make the results more palatable to their funders. Guidelines to help determine what constitutes authorship and the responsibilities of authorship are therefore needed.

Fortunately, such guidance is available.

What Constitutes Authorship?

Most biomedical journals, including CHEST, adhere to the “Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals,”1 published by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. According to this document, which is regularly updated and available online, authors must satisfy all three of the following conditions:

  1. “Substantially contribute” to the conception and design of the study, the acquisition of the data, or the analysis/interpretation of data;
  2. Participate in drafting the article or revising it critically for intellectual content; and
  3. Review and approve the final, submitted version.

As part of the manuscript review process, many journals now seek to quantify these criteria and ask all authors to formally attest, in writing, to their contributions to the paper. This practice is intended to discourage abuses of authorship.

Although the exact definition of what constitutes a “substantial contribution” in criterion No. 1 is purposely left vague, Browner2 has characterized it as an “intellectual contribution” and adds that “People who did just what they were told?no matter how well they did it?do not meet the requirements for authorship.” For example, he suggests that a statistical analyst who only executes an analysis plan designed by someone else has not made an intellectual contribution. In this case, the person who designed the analysis plan presumably would be included, and increasing numbers of journals are now requesting that statisticians be listed as authors on papers that rely considerably on statistical analysis.


Ethical Responsibilities of Authors

Authors are responsible for ensuring that their study methods and findings are honestly reported and that the study was carried out in accordance with generally accepted ethical standards. In particular, outright misconduct, such as falsification of data, fabrication of data, and plagiarism, is considered especially reprehensible and can irreparably damage an author’s career. A greater risk to the credibility of published findings may be posed, however, by less serious practices that do not constitute “misconduct” per se.

Martinson et al3 reported on the results of a survey administered to several thousand early-career and mid-career scientists whose work was funded by the National Institutes of Health. The survey found that one third reported engaging in one or more questionable practices during the past 3 years (Table 1).

The authors concluded that “mundane ‘regular’ misbehaviours present greater threats to the scientific enterprise than those caused by high-profile misconduct cases such as fraud.”

The Uniform Requirements reference widely accepted standards for reporting results of a variety of specific types of studies (Table 2). For example, many journals have adopted the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (or CONSORT) initiative as the standard format for reporting the results of randomized clinical trials. The Quality of Reporting of Meta-Analyses (or QUOROM) statement covers the reporting of metaanalyses.

Table 1-Percentage of Scientists Who Reported That They Engaged in Unethical Behavior Within the Last 3 Years (n = 3,247)*
Variables
All
Mid-Career
Early-Career
Failure to present data that contradict one’s own previous research 6.0 6.5 5.3
Changing the design, methodology, or results of a study in response to pressure from a funding source 15.5 20.6 9.5
Inappropriately assigning authorship credit 10.0 12.3 7.4
Withholding details of methodology or results in papers or proposals 10.8 12.4 8.9
Dropping observations or data points from analyses based on a gut feeling that they were inaccurate 15.3 14.3 16.5
*Data are presented as %. Excerpted from Martinson et al3; reprinted by permission of Macmillan Publisher Ltd (copyright 2005).

Determining Authorship and Order of Listing

Before writing begins, those involved in a study should determine who is to be the lead or first author and what is expected of that individual. Planning ahead in this way can avoid hard feelings and loss of momentum during the writing process, particularly where the lead author is not the principal investigator of the study. Similarly, the lead author should state explicitly when asking for input on a paper what is being asked and whether the individual should expect authorship in return for the input.

The lead author is responsible for developing the initial draft of the manuscript, and has final say regarding the wording and content of the paper. The lead author is responsible for assuring that the coauthors satisfy their responsibilities as authors and for dropping from the manuscript any author who does not meet these responsibilities.

The lead author typically determines the order in which the remaining authors will be listed, although this also may be determined by consensus. The order of authorship should ideally reflect the relative level of intellectual contribution of the coauthors. For collaborative papers reporting on large studies and involving numerous coauthors, it may not be possible to accurately construct such an ordering. In such cases, coauthors are sometimes listed in alphabetical order either after the first author or after the first few authors. This fact may be indicated on the title page of the submitted manuscript and is sometimes noted by the journal. Another exception to a strict ordering by level of contribution is the use of the so-called “senior author” position, in which the senior member of a research team may choose to be listed last.

Since it is always easier to add authors than to remove them, listing the authors on early drafts as “your name and others to be determined” can save disagreements later. Even when the full list of coauthors is fairly clear, listing the authors alphabetically on early drafts with a note “final order to be determined” makes it clear that the order of authorship will depend on the level of input received.

The Acknowledgment section provides a way for authors to recognize the contributions of individuals who contributed to the paper but whose contribution did not merit authorship. Because readers may infer that those acknowledged endorse the data and conclusions of a paper, the Uniform Requirements state that all persons listed in this section must give written permission to be acknowledged.

Table 2-Reporting Guidelines for Specific Study Designs*
VariablesType of Study
Initiative Source
Failure to present data that contradict one’s own previous researchRandomized controlled trials CONSORT http://www.consort-statement.org
Changing the design, methodology, or results of a study in response to pressure from a funding sourceStudies of diagnostic accuracy STARD http://www.consort-statement.org/Initiatives/newstard.htm
Inappropriately assigning authorship creditMeta-analyses and systematic reviews QUORUM http://www.consort-statement.org/Evidence/evidence.html#quorom
Withholding details of methodology or results in papers or proposalsObservational studies in epidemiology STROBE http://www.strobe-statement.org
Dropping observations or data points from analyses based on a gut feeling that they were inaccurateMeta-analyses of observational studies in epidemiology MOOSE http://www.consort-statement.org/ Initiatives/MOOSE/moose.pdf
*CONSORT = Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials; QUOROM = Quality of Reporting of Meta-Analyses; STARD = Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy; STROBE = Strengthening The Reporting Of Observational Studies In Epidemiology; MOOSE = Meta-Analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. Adapted from the "Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical

Journals," section IV.A.1.b.1

All accessed June 8, 2007.

Challenges and Problem Practices

The current climate for research funding and the promotion and tenure policies of most institutions create tremendous pressure on investigators, both senior and junior, to circumvent the now-accepted authorship requirements. This pressure may have several forms, as follows: (1) a perceived need to “pad” one’s curriculum vitae to help ensure a promotion; (2) fear of retribution from a senior faculty member or department head seeking to pad his or her own curriculum vitae; (3) implicit or explicit pressure from a private funder to “get the right answer” or risk losing further grant funding; or (4) the desire to add a high-profile author to a manuscript simply to add greater credibility to the study and hence enhance the likelihood of acceptance of a paper.

Claxton4 enumerates several categories of dubious or outright unethical authorship practices. These include coercion authorship, in which a person in a position of authority uses that position to compel another author to include him/her on a manuscript even though that person does not meet the accepted authorship criteria. Mutual support/admiration authorship occurs when two authors wishing to pad their bibliographies agree to place each others’ names on their respective papers even though each may have made little or no contribution to the other’s paper. Gift authorship occurs when an individual is listed as an author either solely as a gesture of respect (eg, for a mentor) or as an attempt to make a paper appear more credible than it is. Gift authors may be unaware that they have been named on the paper.

A fourth category, the ghostwriter, may follow one of several scenarios. In one, an organization or individual who has had a major influence on a paper may decline to be listed as an author to hide a potential conflict of interest. In the worst case, the employees of an organization do the work, write the paper, and reimburse an “independent” investigator who is willing to be listed as the author. In a second scenario, an author may be hired to write all or part of a manuscript but is not listed as an author or acknowledged in the manuscript. As noted by Woolley, 5 using a ghostwriter is distinct from using a medical writer or technical editor to improve the readability of a manuscript. Using a medical writer or technical editor who is noted in the Acknowledgment section can even be recommended, especially when the authors’ native language is not English.

Finally, Claxton4 refers to what he calls “duplicate production authorships”; that is, publishing essentially the same article in multiple journals, as book chapters, and so on. When done in an abusive manner, the sole purpose may be to pad one’s bibliography. There can be legitimate reasons for publishing highly related articles, however. For instance, many journals are now devoted to publishing reviews or shortened summaries of previously published work. So long as the work is not presented as previously unpublished work, and appropriate permissions are obtained to use (if necessary) the content of previously published work, such articles can be an effective way to provide greater dissemination of one’s work.


Conclusions and Recommendations

Ultimately, the lead author remains responsible for assuring that coauthors satisfy their authorship requirements and for removing them from a paper if they do not comply. Making sure that coauthors are aware at the beginning of the process of their responsibilities as authors will help with this difficult situation.

Take Home Lesson

In closing, Browner2 offers the following useful checklist for lead authors:

  1. Does everyone included as an author meet the requirements of authorship?
  2. Has anyone who deserves to be an author been left out?
  3. Have all authors reviewed and approved the final version of the manuscript?
  4. Does the order of authorship correlate with the contributions made to the paper, with the possible exception of the last (senior) author?

ACKNOWLEDGMENT: Dr. Vollmer would like to acknowledge the help of Martha Swain, Senior Writer-Editor, with compiling and editing this document.

References

  1. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. Available at: http://www.icmje.org/. Accessed October 30, 2007
  2. Browner WS. Publishing and presenting clinical research. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006; 137-144
  3. Martinson BC, Anderson MS, deVries R. Scientists behaving badly. Nature 2005; 435:737-738
  4. Claxton LD. Scientific authorship: part II. History, recurring issues, practices, and guidelines. Mutat Res 2005; 589:31-45
  5. Woolley K. Goodbye ghostwriters! How to work ethically and efficiently with professional medical writers. Chest 2006; 130:921-923


*From the Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, OR.

The author has reported to the ACCP that no significant conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Manuscript received August 13, 2007; revision accepted August 17, 2007.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal. org/misc/reprints.shtml).

Correspondence to: William M. Vollmer, PhD, 3800 N Interstate Ave, Portland, OR 97232; e-mail: William.vollmer@kpchr.org

DOI: 10.1378/chest.07-2051

Responsibilities of Authorship
オーサーシップの責任

William M. Vollmer, PhD

(CHEST 2007; 132:2042-2045)

研究者が昇進の可能性を高め、研究資金を継続的に獲得する上で、ジャーナルに論文を掲載することは、避けることのできない人生の現実である。共同プロジェクトでは、論文に掲載をしなければならない、というプレッシャーが、オーサーシップの順序を巡って正当な共著者間に緊張を生んだり、また業績を水増ししたいと願う研究者が、そのプロセスを不正に操作したりすることに繋がりかねない。これから投稿を予定している著者は、論文が採用される可能性を高めるため、あるいは研究資金の提供者に、より気に入ってもらうようにするために、自分たちのデータを操作したり、研究結果を偽って伝えたりするプレッシャーを抱えることになるかもしれない。そのため、オーサーシップとは何か、そしてオーサーシップの責任とは何かを定義するのに役に立つガイドラインが必要である。幸いにも、そうしたガイドラインは入手可能である。

オーサーシップとは

 CHESTを含め、たいていの生物医学系ジャーナルは、国際医学ジャーナル編集者委員会 International Committee of Medical Journal Editorsが発行している「生物医学雑誌に論文を投稿するための統一規定」 に従っている。この文書は常に更新され、オンラインで入手できるが、それによると、著者は次にあげる3つの条件すべてを満たしていなければならない。

  1. 研究の概念と研究デザイン、データの取得、データの分析・解釈に対して「実質的な貢献」をすること。
  2. 記事の草稿作成に加わり、知的内容について慎重に校正すること。
  3. 全体を読み直し、最終投稿版として承認すること。

 原稿の査読プロセスの一部として、多くのジャーナルが現在上記の基準の定量化を模索しており、すべての著者が、論文に、どのように貢献したのかについて正式に書面で言明するよう求めている。これはオーサーシップの誤用を防ぐことを意図したものである。

 条件の1. の「実質的な貢献」とは何か、という明確な定義は意図的に曖昧にされているが、Browner2 は「知的な貢献」と特徴づけ、「例えどんなに上手に書いたとしても、ただ言われたとおりにしただけでは、オーサーシップの要件を満たさない」と補足している。例えば、他人が策定した分析手順をただ実行したにすぎない統計分析者は知的な貢献をしていない、ということを示唆しているのである。この場合、分析手順を策定した人は恐らく著者に含まれるだろうが、最近は、統計分析にかなり依存している論文の場合には、統計学者を著者として含めるよう要求するジャーナルが益々増えてきている。

著者の倫理的責任

 著者は研究方法及び研究結果が公正に報告されていること、そして研究が一般的に認められている倫理基準に沿って実施されたものであることを保証する責任がある。特に、データの改ざん、データの捏造、剽窃といった明らかな不正行為は非難の対象とされ、著者の経歴に取り返しがつかないほどのダメージを与えることになる。しかしながら、掲載された研究成果の信憑性に対して、より大きなリスクとなりうるのは、本質的な「不正行為」には当たらない、さほど重大ではない行為である。

 Martinson3 らは、国立衛生研究所 (NIH) からの資金提供で研究を行った、若手~中堅の科学者、数千人を対象に実施した調査結果について報告を行った。調査の結果、3分の1の研究者が過去3年間に1件以上の疑わしい研究行為を行ったと報告していることがわかった(表1)。同著者らは「世間で注目を集める偽造などの目立った不正行為よりも、日常的に『頻繁に起こる』不正行為の方が、科学研究にとって、より大きな脅威である」と結論づけている。

 統一規定では、様々な種類の特殊なタイプの研究結果を報告する際に使用する、広く一般に認められている基準を、参考文献として引用している(表2)。例えば、多くのジャーナルは、ランダム化比較臨床試験 (RCT) の結果を報告するための標準的なフォーマットとして、臨床試験報告に対する統合基準Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) を採用している。また、メタ・アナリシスの報告の質The Quality of Reporting of Meta-Analyses (QUOROM) の声明では、メタ・アナリシスの報告について扱っている。

表1-過去3年以内に非倫理的な行為を行ったと報告している科学者の割合(%)
(n=3,247)*
行為の種類
全体
中堅科学者
若手科学者
自身の以前の研究に相反するデータ を発表しなかった 6.0 6.5 5.3
資金提供元からの圧力により、研究のデザイン、方法、結果を変更した 15.5 20.6 9.5
不適切であることを承知しながら著者資格を与えた 10.0 12.3 7.4
論文や研究計画の中で、方法や結果の詳細な公表をしなかった 10.8 12.4 8.9
直感的に不正確であると感じたため、分析から、観察やデータの主要点を削除した 15.3 14.3 16.5
*データは%表示。Martinsonら3 からの引用; Macmillan Publisher Ltd (copyright 2005) の許可を得て転載。

オーサーシップと記載順序の決定

 論文執筆前に、研究に携わったメンバーの間で、誰が筆頭著者(ファースト・オーサー)になるのか、そして筆頭著者に求められる任務とは何かを決めなければならない。このように予め計画しておくと、特に筆頭著者が、その研究の主要研究者でない場合、論文の執筆過程で、恨みが生じたり、やる気を失ったりするのを回避できる。同様に、筆頭著者が第三者に対し論文へのアドバイスを求める際には、何を尋ねるのか、またアドバイスの見返りに、その第三者に著者資格を与えるかどうかについて、明確に述べる必要がある。

 筆頭著者は初稿を執筆する責任を持ち、論文の言い回しや内容について最終的な発言権を持つ。筆頭著者は、共著者が著者としての責任を果たしているかどうかを確認し、責任を果たしていない著者を著者リストから外す責任がある。

 通常は筆頭著者が、その他の著者の記載順序を決定するが、場合によって、著者間の総意によって決める場合もありうる。オーサーシップの順序は、理想的には、共著者の知的貢献度のレベルを反映すべきである。多数の共著者が関わる大規模研究を報告する共同論文では、正確に著者の順序を決めるのが困難なことがある。そのような場合、共著者は筆頭著者の直後あるいは、最初の数名の著者の後にアルファベット順に記載されることがあり、その旨は論文のタイトルページに記載する。また、これについては、ジャーナルに具体的な指示がある場合もある。貢献の度合いによって著者の順序を厳格に決めるというルールには、もう一つ例外がある。いわゆる「シニアオーサー」の扱いであるが、研究チームの中で最も職位の高い著者は、自身の氏名が著者リストの最後に記載されるのを選ぶ可能性がある。

 著者名は、除くことよりも追加する方が常にたやすいので、初期の草稿で「あなたとその他共著者の名前はあとで決定します」と記載した上で著者名を列挙しておくと、あとで起こりうる意見の不一致を防ぐことができる。たとえ共著者全員のリストが極めて明瞭であったとしても、初期段階の原稿に「最終的な著者の順序はあとで決定します」というメモをつけて、著者名をアルファベット順に列挙することにより、オーサーシップの順序は、論文に対する貢献度合いにより決まる、ということを明確に示すことができる。

 謝辞のセクションでは、著者資格は満たさなかったものの、論文に貢献してくれた人の貢献を認めることができる。読者は、謝辞に記載されている人々は、その論文のデータと結論を確認しているものと理解する可能性があるため、統一規定では、謝辞のセクションに氏名が列挙される人々全員から、謝辞に氏名が掲載されることについての許可を文書で得なければならない、と述べている。

表2 特定の研究デザインのための報告ガイドライン*
研究の種類
発案団体 情報源
無作為化試験 CONSORT http://www.consort-statement.org
診断確度の研究 STARD http://www.consort-statement.org/Initiatives/newstard.htm
メタ・アナリシスとシステマティックレビュー QUORUM http://www.consort-statement.org/Evidence/evidence.html#quorom
疫学の観察研究 STROBE http://www.strobe-statement.org
疫学における観察研究のメタ・アナリシス MOOSE http://www.consort-statement.org/Initiatives/MOOSE/moose.pdf
*CONSORT = Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials; QUOROM = Quality of Reporting of Meta-Analyses; STARD = Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy; STROBE = Strengthening The Reporting Of Observational Studies In Epidemiology; MOOSE = Meta-Analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology.

「生物医学雑誌への投稿原稿のための統一規定」 section IV.A.1.b.1より引用。

アクセス年月日: 2007年6月8日

課題と問題点

 大抵の大学における最近の研究資金、昇進、終身在職権を巡る風潮は、現在受け入れられているオーサーシップの必要条件を巧みに回避しようとする若手・年長双方の研究者に、大きなプレッシャーとなっている。このプレッシャーは次にあげるような形をとる可能性がある。(1) 自分の昇進を確実にするのに役立つよう履歴書(CV)の「水増し」をするという、よくある必要性 (2) 履歴書の水増しを目論む、職位の高い上司や学部長から報復を受けるかもしれないという不安 (3) 「好ましい回答を得る」ために個人の資金提供者から受ける暗黙または公然のプレッシャー、または、今後研究資金を受け取れなくなるリスク (4) 研究に対する信憑性を高め、論文のアクセプトの可能性を高めるというだけの理由で、知名度の高い人を著者に加えたいという願望。

 Claxton4 は、完全に非倫理的な、または疑わしいオーサーシップ行為を幾つかのカテゴリーに分類して列挙している。この中には、権威ある地位にいる人が、一般に認められているオーサーシップの基準を満たしていないにもかかわらず、その地位を利用して、他の人の論文の著者リストに無理矢理自分の名前を入れさせるという強要型オーサーシップがある。また、相互支援・賞賛型オーサーシップは、業績を水増ししたいと思っている二人の著者が、相手方の論文にほとんど、または全く貢献していないにもかかわらず、お互いの名前をそれぞれの論文の著者リストに加えることに同意する、というものである。次に、ギフトオーサーシップは、例えば恩師に敬意を表する目的のためだけに、あるいは論文を実際よりも信憑性があるように見せかけるために、ある個人を著者として含める、という場合に発生する。自分の名前が論文に載っていることに気づかないギフトオーサーがいる可能性もある。

 4番目のカテゴリーのゴーストライターにはいくつかのシナリオがある可能性がある。一つ目は、潜在的な利益相反を隠蔽するため、論文に主たる影響をもたらした組織あるいは個人が、自分の名前を著者リストに入れるのを拒むことがある。最悪の場合、組織の被雇用者が研究を実施し、論文を執筆したが、自分の名前は著者リストに入れず、その代わりに、著者として名前が掲載されることに同意した「研究に関係のない」研究者に報酬を支払い、その人の名前を借りる、ということがある。二番目のシナリオは、ある著者が論文全体あるいは一部を執筆するために雇われたものの、論文の著者リストのみならず、謝辞にすら名前が記載されないという場合である。Wooley5 が記述しているように、ゴーストライターを使うことは、論文の読みやすさを改善するためにメディカルライターやテクニカルエディターを使うこととは、はっきりした違いがある。特に著者の母国語が英語でない場合には、メディカルライターやテクニカルエディターを使い、謝辞のセクションにその旨を記載することを推奨したい。

 最後に、Claxton4 は、彼曰く「二重生産オーサーシップ」、つまり本質的に同じ記事を複数のジャーナルに本のチャプターなどのように投稿することについて言及している。もし、これが悪意を持って行われるならば、自分の著書目録の水増しをすることが唯一の目的である可能性がある。しかしながら、極めて関連のある記事を掲載する正当な理由がある場合がある。例えば、最近は、レビュー記事や、以前に掲載された論文の短い要約版の掲載を熱心に行うジャーナルも数多くある。その論文が以前に掲載されたものであると記載され、そして以前掲載された論文内容の使用許可を(必要ならば)得ていれば、そのような記事は論文をより多くの人に読んでもらえるようにするための効果的な方法となりうる。

結論と提案

 大事なことは、筆頭著者が、共著者がオーサーシップの必要条件を満たしているのかを確かめ、もし基準を満たしていない場合には、論文から名前を削除する責任があるということである。最初の段階から、共著者に著者としての責任を意識させることが、この困難な状況を解決するのに役立つだろう。

TAKE HOME LESSON

 最後に、Browner2 が提供している筆頭著者にとって役立つチェックリストを以下に挙げて、締めくくりとする。

  1. 著者として全ての人がオーサーシップの必要条件を満たしているかどうか。
  2. 著者に値する人は全て含まれているかどうか。
  3. 論文の最終版で全ての著者が確認されて承認されたかどうか。
  4. オーサーシップの順序は論文に対する貢献度と一致しているかどうか。最後に記載されるシニアオーサーは例外として除く。

謝辞:この記事の編集及び校正にご協力をいただきましたシニアライターでありエディターであるMartha Swainに心より感謝をいたします。

参考文献

  1. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. Available at: http://www.icmje.org/. Accessed October 30, 2007
  2. Browner WS. Publishing and presenting clinical research. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006; 137-144
  3. Martinson BC, Anderson MS, deVries R. Scientists behaving badly. Nature 2005; 435:737-738
  4. Claxton LD. Scientific authorship: part II. History, recurring issues, practices, and guidelines. Mutat Res 2005; 589:31-45
  5. Woolley K. Goodbye ghostwriters! How to work ethically and efficiently with professional medical writers. Chest 2006; 130:921-923

(訳)福山美典、仲野小絵、J. パトリック・バロン

前のページへウィンドウを閉じる次のページへ